Check Out Mothering Humanity

As I launch this blog, I’m very hesitant to shout from the rooftops and direct people I know to the site. Why? You might wonder. Well, I’m not sure I’m living the kind of life I hope to promote here. It is, however, what I aspire to.

So, if it’s ok with you, I’d like to embark on this journey together. I want to be the kind of change I wish to see in the world, but I’m not there yet. If you like the kinds of changes I promote here, than hang around. Maybe, we can make the world a better place a little at a time, or as they say here in Spain, “poco a poco.”

Today, at the grocery store, I practiced the kind of humanity I hope to promote. I’ll explain….

As I approached the checkout aisles, I noticed a handful of people hovering between two registers. One aisle had two people unloading small baskets onto the belt. The other aisle had a haggard-looking mom carefully unloading a basketful of groceries. Her purchase, which was quite large, was being dutifully loaded into bags at the other end of the checkout by, presumably, her husband while two children between the ages of six and ten ran back and forth. In time, the shoppers slowly gravitated to the faster moving checkout.

I had very few items, but I happily moved in line behind the mother and her now half-full cart. I purposely caught her eye, smiled, and said hello. She graciously smiled back and returned the salutation. She ended up having two separate purchases to boot: all the family’s groceries, and then a large stack of coffee packets. I silently wondered if she kept her “mom fuel” on a separate budget. The cashier gave me an apologetic look. I just smiled at him, too.

I’m a smiley person, but I’m not a patient person. Today, I practiced patience.

I don’t know how many times I’ve gone through this same exact grocery store extremely hurried, been impatient with the person before me or the cashier, and rushed off without being courteous to anyone. I’ve also been in this mother’s shoes. Trying my best to organize the items I place on the belt, so they can go into the bags a certain way, in order to facilitate storage later at home. I’ve been haggard. I’ve been pressed for time, energy, sleep, etc…. Today, I just waited – happily.

When the cashier again gave me a look as he finished ringing up the second purchase and motioned towards the family – now, moving their large load from the counter into their cart or arms – I verbally let him know that I was in no hurry. Then, even louder, I corrected myself.

“Well, we’re all in a hurry, aren’t we? That doesn’t mean I have to make this mother feel guilty and try to rush her. I can wait,” I said, and I shot another smile at the struggling mother.

I decided to share this story with you, because this blog is already heightening my own awareness of how I move through this world. I’m so glad you’ve decided to take some of your precious time and read my story. Stick around, this is only the beginning of Mothering Humanity.

Luv&Hugs,

*Kris*

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s